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OpenSuSE 11.1 Quick Start Guide
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11.0 Copying and Sharing Files

If using multiple operating systems (OS) simultaneously, it is often necessary to exchange files among them. Different systems may reside on different partitions on the same machine or on different machines across your network. There are various approaches to file exchange with different basic instructions and possible pitfalls.

WARNING: Scenarios for Private Home Networks Only

Do not use the following scenarios in networks other than your own private and trusted home network that is protected by a firewall. Implementing high security measures for the configurations featured in the following sections is beyond the scope of this document.

Exchanging data may encompass either one of the following tasks:

Copying

To copy your data means to transfer your data from one system to the other. This results in identical objects on both the source and the target system.

Synchronizing data is a special way to copy data. If you change a file on one computer, it is automatically changed on the other computer after the synchronization. For example, think of a laptop that contains your modified files and you want to have the same contents on your desktop computer.

Sharing

Sharing your files means establishing a client/server relationship. The server provides files that can be accessed by the client. When changing a file, you modify it on the server, not locally on the client. File servers typically serve a large number of clients simultaneously.

OpenSuSE 11.1 Quick Start Guide
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