Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions

  




 

 

System Administration Guide: Network Services
Previous Next

NFS Files

You need several files to support NFS activities on any computer. Many of these files are ASCII, but some of the files are data files. Table 6-1 lists these files and their functions.

Table 6-1 NFS Files

File Name

Function

/etc/default/autofs

Lists configuration information for the autofs environment.

/etc/default/fs

Lists the default file-system type for local file systems.

/etc/default/nfs

Lists configuration information for lockd and nfsd. For more information, refer to Keywords for the /etc/default/nfs File and the nfs(4) man page.

/etc/default/nfslogd

Lists configuration information for the NFS server logging daemon, nfslogd.

/etc/dfs/dfstab

Lists the local resources to be shared.

/etc/dfs/fstypes

Lists the default file-system types for remote file systems.

/etc/dfs/sharetab

Lists the local and remote resources that are shared. See the sharetab(4) man page. Do not edit this file.

/etc/mnttab

Lists file systems that are currently mounted, including automounted directories. See the mnttab(4) man page. Do not edit this file.

/etc/netconfig

Lists the transport protocols. Do not edit this file.

/etc/nfs/nfslog.conf

Lists general configuration information for NFS server logging.

/etc/nfs/nfslogtab

Lists information for log postprocessing by nfslogd. Do not edit this file.

/etc/nfssec.conf

Lists NFS security services.

/etc/rmtab

Lists file systems that are remotely mounted by NFS clients. See the rmtab(4) man page. Do not edit this file.

/etc/vfstab

Defines file systems to be mounted locally. See the vfstab(4) man page.

The first entry in /etc/dfs/fstypes is often used as the default file-system type for remote file systems. This entry defines the NFS file-system type as the default.

Only one entry is in /etc/default/fs: the default file-system type for local disks. You can determine the file-system types that are supported on a client or server by checking the files in /kernel/fs.

/etc/default/autofs File

Starting in the Solaris 10 release, you can use the /etc/default/autofs file to configure your autofs environment. Specifically, this file provides an additional way to configure your autofs commands and autofs daemons. The same specifications you would make on the command line can be made in this configuration file. However, unlike the specifications you would make on the command line, this file preserves your specifications, even during upgrades to your operating system. Additionally, you are no longer required to update critical startup files to ensure that the existing behavior of your autofs environment is preserved. You can make your specifications by providing values for the following keywords:

AUTOMOUNT_TIMEOUT

Sets the duration for a file system to remain idle before the file system is unmounted. This keyword is the equivalent of the -t argument for the automount command. The default value is 600.

AUTOMOUNT_VERBOSE

Provides notification of autofs mounts, unmounts, and other nonessential events. This keyword is the equivalent of the -v argument for automount. The default value is FALSE.

AUTOMOUNTD_VERBOSE

Logs status messages to the console and is the equivalent of the -v argument for the automountd daemon. The default value is FALSE.

AUTOMOUNTD_NOBROWSE

Turns browsing on or off for all autofs mount points and is the equivalent of the -n argument for automountd. The default value is FALSE.

AUTOMOUNTD_TRACE

Expands each remote procedure call (RPC) and displays the expanded RPC on standard output. This keyword is the equivalent of the -T argument for automountd. The default value is 0. Values can range from 0 to 5.

AUTOMOUNTD_ENV

Permits you to assign different values to different environments. This keyword is the equivalent of the -D argument for automountd. The AUTOMOUNTD_ENV keyword can be used multiple times. However, you must use separate lines for each environment assignment.

For more information, refer to the man pages for automount(1M) and automountd(1M). For procedural information, refer to How to Use the /etc/default/autofs File.

Keywords for the /etc/default/nfs File

In NFS version 4, the following keywords can be set in the /etc/default/nfs file. These keywords control the NFS protocols that are used by both the client and server.

NFS_SERVER_VERSMIN

Sets the minimum version of the NFS protocol to be registered and offered by the server. Starting in the Solaris 10 release, the default is 2. Other valid values include 3 or 4. Refer to Setting Up NFS Services.

NFS_SERVER_VERSMAX

Sets the maximum version of the NFS protocol to be registered and offered by the server. Starting in the Solaris 10 release, the default is 4. Other valid values include 2 or 3. Refer to Setting Up NFS Services.

NFS_CLIENT_VERSMIN

Sets the minimum version of the NFS protocol to be used by the NFS client. Starting in the Solaris 10 release, the default is 2. Other valid values include 3 or 4. Refer to Setting Up NFS Services.

NFS_CLIENT_VERSMAX

Sets the maximum version of the NFS protocol to be used by the NFS client. Starting in the Solaris 10 release, the default is 4. Other valid values include 2 or 3. Refer to Setting Up NFS Services.

NFS_SERVER_DELEGATION

Controls whether the NFS version 4 delegation feature is enabled for the server. If this feature is enabled, the server attempts to provide delegations to the NFS version 4 client. By default, server delegation is enabled. To disable server delegation, see How to Select Different Versions of NFS on a Server. For more information, refer to Delegation in NFS Version 4.

NFSMAPID_DOMAIN

Sets a common domain for clients and servers. Overrides the default behavior of using the local DNS domain name. For task information, refer to Setting Up NFS Services. Also, see nfsmapid Daemon.

/etc/default/nfslogd File

This file defines some of the parameters that are used when using NFS server logging. The following parameters can be defined.

CYCLE_FREQUENCY

Determines the number of hours that must pass before the log files are cycled. The default value is 24 hours. This option is used to prevent the log files from growing too large.

IDLE_TIME

Sets the number of seconds nfslogd should sleep before checking for more information in the buffer file. This parameter also determines how often the configuration file is checked. This parameter, along with MIN_PROCESSING_SIZE, determines how often the buffer file is processed. The default value is 300 seconds. Increasing this number can improve performance by reducing the number of checks.

MAPPING_UPDATE_INTERVAL

Specifies the number of seconds between updates of the records in the file-handle-to-path mapping tables. The default value is 86400 seconds or one day. This parameter helps keep the file-handle-to-path mapping tables up-to-date without having to continually update the tables.

MAX_LOGS_PRESERVE

Determines the number of log files to be saved. The default value is 10.

MIN_PROCESSING_SIZE

Sets the minimum number of bytes that the buffer file must reach before processing and writing to the log file. This parameter, along with IDLE_TIME, determines how often the buffer file is processed. The default value is 524288 bytes. Increasing this number can improve performance by reducing the number of times the buffer file is processed.

PRUNE_TIMEOUT

Selects the number of hours that must pass before a file-handle-to-path mapping record times out and can be reduced. The default value is 168 hours or 7 days.

UMASK

Specifies the file mode creation mask for the log files that are created by nfslogd. The default value is 0137.

/etc/nfs/nfslog.conf File

This file defines the path, file names, and type of logging to be used by nfslogd. Each definition is associated with a tag. Starting NFS server logging requires that you identify the tag for each file system. The global tag defines the default values. You can use the following parameters with each tag as needed.

defaultdir=path

Specifies the default directory path for the logging files. Unless you specify differently, the default directory is /var/nfs.

log=path/filename

Sets the path and file name for the log files. The default is /var/nfs/nfslog.

fhtable=path/filename

Selects the path and file name for the file-handle-to-path database files. The default is /var/nfs/fhtable.

buffer=path/filename

Determines the path and file name for the buffer files. The default is /var/nfs/nfslog_workbuffer.

logformat=basic|extended

Selects the format to be used when creating user-readable log files. The basic format produces a log file that is similar to some ftpd daemons. The extended format gives a more detailed view.

If the path is not specified, the path that is defined by defaultdir is used. Also, you can override defaultdir by using an absolute path.

To identify the files more easily, place the files in separate directories. Here is an example of the changes that are needed.

% cat /etc/nfs/nfslog.conf
#ident  "@(#)nfslog.conf        1.5     99/02/21 SMI"
#
  .
  .
# NFS server log configuration file.
#

global  defaultdir=/var/nfs \
        log=nfslog fhtable=fhtable buffer=nfslog_workbuffer

publicftp log=logs/nfslog fhtable=fh/fhtables buffer=buffers/workbuffer

In this example, any file system that is shared with log=publicftp uses the following values:

  • The default directory is /var/nfs.

  • Log files are stored in /var/nfs/logs/nfslog*.

  • File-handle-to-path database tables are stored in /var/nfs/fh/fhtables.

  • Buffer files are stored in /var/nfs/buffers/workbuffer.

For procedural information, refer to How to Enable NFS Server Logging.

Previous Next

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire