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System Administration Guide: Virtualization Using the Solaris Operating System
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Activating and Removing Pool Configurations

Use the pooladm command to make a particular pool configuration active or to remove the currently active pool configuration. See the pooladm(1M) man page for more information about this command.

How to Activate a Pools Configuration

To activate the configuration in the default configuration file, /etc/pooladm.conf, invoke pooladm with the -c option, “commit configuration.”

  1. Become superuser, or assume a role that includes the Process Management profile.

    The System Administrator role includes the Process Management profile. For more information about roles, see Using the Solaris Management Tools With RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Commit the configuration at /etc/pooladm.conf.
    # pooladm -c
  3. (Optional) Copy the dynamic configuration to a static configuration file, for example, /tmp/backup.
    # pooladm -s /tmp/backup

How to Validate a Configuration Before Committing the Configuration

You can use the -n option with the -c option to test what will happen when the validation occurs. The configuration will not actually be committed.

The following command attempts to validate the configuration contained at /home/admin/newconfig. Any error conditions encountered are displayed, but the configuration itself is not modified.

  1. Become superuser, or assume a role that includes the Process Management profile.

    The System Administrator role includes the Process Management profile. For more information about roles, see Using the Solaris Management Tools With RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Test the validity of the configuration before committing it.
    # pooladm -n -c /home/admin/newconfig

How to Remove a Pools Configuration

To remove the current active configuration and return all associated resources, such as processor sets, to their default status, use the -x option for “remove configuration.”

  1. Become superuser, or assume a role that includes the Process Management profile.

    The System Administrator role includes the Process Management profile. For more information about roles, see Using the Solaris Management Tools With RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Basic Administration.

  2. Remove the current active configuration.
    # pooladm -x

    The -x option to pooladm removes all user-defined elements from the dynamic configuration. All resources revert to their default states, and all pool bindings are replaced with a binding to the default pool.

More Information
Mixing Scheduling Classes Within a Processor Set

You can safely mix processes in the TS and IA classes in the same processor set. Mixing other scheduling classes within one processor set can lead to unpredictable results. If the use of pooladm -x results in mixed scheduling classes within one processor set, use the priocntl command to move running processes into a different scheduling class. See How to Manually Move Processes From the TS Class Into the FSS Class. Also see the priocntl(1) man page.

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