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System Administration Guide: Virtualization Using the Solaris Operating System
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Resource Pools Framework

The /etc/pooladm.conf configuration file describes the static pools configuration. A static configuration represents the way in which an administrator would like a system to be configured with respect to resource pools functionality. An alternate file name can be specified.

When the service management facility (SMF) or the pooladm -e command is used to enable the resource pools framework, then, if an /etc/pooladm.conf file exists, the configuration contained in the file is applied to the system.

The kernel holds information about the disposition of resources within the resource pools framework. This is known as the dynamic configuration, and it represents the resource pools functionality for a particular system at a point in time. The dynamic configuration can be viewed by using the pooladm command. Note that the order in which properties are displayed for pools and resource sets can vary. Modifications to the dynamic configuration are made in the following ways:

  • Indirectly, by applying a static configuration file

  • Directly, by using the poolcfg command with the -d option

More than one static pools configuration file can exist, for activation at different times. You can alternate between multiple pools configurations by invoking pooladm from a cron job. See the cron(1M) man page for more information on the cron utility.

By default, the resource pools framework is not active. Resource pools must be enabled to create or modify the dynamic configuration. Static configuration files can be manipulated with the poolcfg or libpool commands even if the resource pools framework is disabled. Static configuration files cannot be created if the pools facility is not active. For more information on the configuration file, see Creating Pools Configurations.

The commands used with resource pools and the poold system daemon are described in the following man pages:

/etc/pooladm.conf Contents

All resource pool configurations, including the dynamic configuration, can contain the following elements.

system

Properties affecting the total behavior of the system

pool

A resource pool definition

pset

A processor set definition

cpu

A processor definition

All of these elements have properties that can be manipulated to alter the state and behavior of the resource pools framework. For example, the pool property pool.importance indicates the relative importance of a given pool. This property is used for possible resource dispute resolution. For more information, see libpool(3LIB).

Pools Properties

The pools facility supports named, typed properties that can be placed on a pool, resource, or component. Administrators can store additional properties on the various pool elements. A property namespace similar to the project attribute is used.

For example, the following comment indicates that a given pset is associated with a particular Datatree database.

Datatree,pset.dbname=warehouse

For additional information about property types, see poold Properties.


Note - A number of special properties are reserved for internal use and cannot be set or removed. See the libpool(3LIB) man page for more information.


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  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire