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System Administration Guide: Virtualization Using the Solaris Operating System
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Administering the Resource Capping Daemon With rcapadm

This section contains procedures for configuring the resource capping daemon with rcapadm. See rcapd Configuration and the rcapadm(1M) man page for more information.

If used without arguments, rcapadm displays the current status of the resource capping daemon if it has been configured.

How to Set the Memory Cap Enforcement Threshold

Caps can be configured so that they will not be enforced until the physical memory available to processes is low. See Memory Cap Enforcement Threshold for more information.

The minimum (and default) value is 0, which means that memory caps are always enforced. To set a different minimum, follow this procedure.

  1. Become superuser, or assume a role that includes the Process Management profile.

    The System Administrator role includes the Process Management profile. For information on how to create the role and assign the role to a user, see Managing RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Use the -c option of rcapadm to set a different physical memory utilization value for memory cap enforcement.
    # rcapadm -c percent

    percent is in the range 0 to 100. Higher values are less restrictive. A higher value means capped project workloads can execute without having caps enforced until the system's memory utilization exceeds this threshold.

See Also

To display the current physical memory utilization and the cap enforcement threshold, see Reporting Memory Utilization and the Memory Cap Enforcement Threshold.

How to Set Operation Intervals

rcapd Operation Intervals contains information about the intervals for the periodic operations performed by rcapd. To set operation intervals using rcapadm, follow this procedure.

  1. Become superuser, or assume a role that includes the Process Management profile.

    The System Administrator role includes the Process Management profile. For information on how to create the role and assign the role to a user, see Managing RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Use the -i option to set interval values.
    # rcapadm -i interval=value,...,interval=value 

    Note - All interval values are specified in seconds.


How to Enable Resource Capping

There are three ways to enable resource capping on your system. Enabling resource capping also sets the /etc/rcap.conf file with default values.

  1. Become superuser, or assume a role that includes the Process Management profile.

    The System Administrator role includes the Process Management profile. For information on how to create the role and assign the role to a user, see Managing RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Enable the resource capping daemon in one of the following ways:
    • Turn on resource capping using the svcadm command.

      # svcadm enable rcap
    • Enable the resource capping daemon so that it will be started now and also be started each time the system is booted:

      # rcapadm -E
    • Enable the resource capping daemon at boot without starting it now by also specifying the -n option:

      # rcapadm -n -E

How to Disable Resource Capping

There are three ways to disable resource capping on your system.

  1. Become superuser, or assume a role that includes the Process Management profile.

    The System Administrator role includes the Process Management profile. For information on how to create the role and assign the role to a user, see Managing RBAC (Task Map) in System Administration Guide: Security Services.

  2. Disable the resource capping daemon in one of the following ways:
    • Turn off resource capping using the svcadm command.
      # svcadm disable rcap
    • To disable the resource capping daemon so that it will be stopped now and not be started when the system is booted, type:
      # rcapadm -D
    • To disable the resource capping daemon without stopping it, also specify the -n option:
      # rcapadm -n -D

    Tip - Disabling the Resource Capping Daemon Safely


    Use rcapadm -D to safely disable rcapd. If the daemon is killed (see the kill(1) man page), processes might be left in a stopped state and need to be manually restarted. To resume a process running, use the prun command. See the prun(1) man page for more information.

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  Published under the terms fo the Public Documentation License Version 1.01. Design by Interspire