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OpenOffice 3.x Getting Started Guide
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Imagine repeatedly entering simple information. Although you can store the information in the clipboard, if you use the clipboard for something else, the contents are changed. Storing the contents as a macro is a simple solution. (In some simple cases, including the example used here, a better solution is to use AutoText.)

  1. Use Tools > Macros > Record Macro to start recording a macro. A small window is displayed so you know that OpenOffice.org is recording.
  2. Image:StopRecording.png

  3. Type the desired information or perform an appropriate series of operations. In this case, I typed my name, Andrew Pitonyak.
  4. Click the Stop Recording button to stop recording, save the macro, and display the OpenOffice.org Basic Macros dialog.
  5. OOo Macro Organizer dialog, DBInspection library selected.
  6. Be certain to open the library container named My Macros. Find the library named Standard under My Macros. Be warned, every library container has a library named Standard. Select the Standard library and click New Module to create a new module to contain the macro.
  7. The default module name is Module1; choose a better name. Although it is still not descriptive, I used Recorded. Type a descriptive name and click OK to create the module. The OpenOffice.org Basic Macros dialog is displayed again, showing the new module.
  8. Highlight the newly created module. In the upper left corner, type the macro name to use, such as “EnterMyname", and then click Save to save the macro.
  9. Naming a new macro

If you followed all of the steps, the Standard library now contains a module named Recorded, which contains the EnterMyName macro. When OOo creates a new module, it automatically adds the macro named Main.


OpenOffice 3.x Getting Started Guide
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