Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions

  




 

 

4.3.  Make JPEGs Smaller

Figure 3.18.  Example Image for JPEG Saving

Example Image for JPEG Saving

You can make your jpegs smaller without changing the pixel width of the image. Actually you can change the weight of the image a lot. I used an(other) image from APOD [APOD04]. The original image is huge (3000 pixels wide) so I also made a smaller (pixel width) image available. To prepare this image for the web, you should first reduce the image to a better width and height for web viewing as described in the Section 4.2, “ Change the Size of an Image (Scale). Right click on the properly scaled image and follow the menus FileSave As... at the image window. The Save Dialog will pop up.

I generally type the filename I want into the text box, but the Extension drop menu can tell you the available file formats (depending on the libraries you have installed and the conditions of the image you are trying to save). If The GIMP complains right now, or if “JPEG” is grayed out in the Extensions menu you should just cancel out of everything and step through the Section 4.6, “ Change the Mode.

In the JPEG Save Dialog, you can opt for The GIMP defaults which reduce the size quite a bit, without hurting the visual quality in a way that I can detect. This would be the safest and quickest thing to do.

Figure 3.19.  Dialog for Image Saving as JPEG

Dialog for Image Saving as JPEG

If you would like to make it smaller still, make sure that the “Preview” toggle is on and then watch the image area and change the compression level by moving the “Quality” slider down. You can see the quality of the image changing, especially towards the leftmost end of the slider. Above is a screenshot of me doing this very thing. As you can see, very small is also very bad. I have a screenshot of me setting the Quality slider to a more acceptable level below.

Figure 3.20.  Dialog for Image Saving as JPEG

Dialog for Image Saving as JPEG

I have not been showing the actual jpegs I created so that we could end this quickie with a race.

Figure 3.21.  Example for High JPEG Compression

Example for High JPEG Compression

Quality: 6; Size: 1361 Bytes

Example for High JPEG Compression

Quality: 42; Size: 3549 Bytes


Figure 3.22.  Example for Moderate JPEG Compression

Example for Moderate JPEG Compression

Quality: 85 (GIMPs default); Size: 6837 Bytes

Example for Moderate JPEG Compression

Quality: 100; Size: 20,971 Bytes



 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire