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5.2.4. Server Status Variables

The server maintains many status variables that provide information about its operation. You can view these variables and their values by using the SHOW STATUS statement:

mysql> SHOW STATUS;
+-----------------------------------+------------+
| Variable_name                     | Value      |
+-----------------------------------+------------+
| Aborted_clients                   | 0          |
| Aborted_connects                  | 0          |
| Bytes_received                    | 155372598  |
| Bytes_sent                        | 1176560426 |
...
| Connections                       | 30023      |
| Created_tmp_disk_tables           | 0          |
| Created_tmp_files                 | 3          |
| Created_tmp_tables                | 2          |
...
| Threads_created                   | 217        |
| Threads_running                   | 88         |
| Uptime                            | 1389872    |
+-----------------------------------+------------+

Many status variables are reset to 0 by the FLUSH STATUS statement.

The status variables have the following meanings. Variables with no version indicated were already present prior to MySQL 5.1. For information regarding their implementation history, see MySQL 5.0 Reference Manual.

  • Aborted_clients

    The number of connections that were aborted because the client died without closing the connection properly. See Section A.2.10, “Communication Errors and Aborted Connections”.

  • Aborted_connects

    The number of failed attempts to connect to the MySQL server. See Section A.2.10, “Communication Errors and Aborted Connections”.

  • Binlog_cache_disk_use

    The number of transactions that used the temporary binary log cache but that exceeded the value of binlog_cache_size and used a temporary file to store statements from the transaction.

  • Binlog_cache_use

    The number of transactions that used the temporary binary log cache.

  • Bytes_received

    The number of bytes received from all clients.

  • Bytes_sent

    The number of bytes sent to all clients.

  • Com_xxx

    The Com_xxx statement counter variables indicate the number of times each xxx statement has been executed. There is one status variable for each type of statement. For example, Com_delete and Com_insert count DELETE and INSERT statements, respectively.

    The Com_stmt_xxx status variables are as follows:

    • Com_stmt_prepare

    • Com_stmt_execute

    • Com_stmt_fetch

    • Com_stmt_send_long_data

    • Com_stmt_reset

    • Com_stmt_close

    Those variables stand for prepared statement commands. Their names refer to the COM_xxx command set used in the network layer. In other words, their values increase whenever prepared statement API calls such as mysql_stmt_prepare(), mysql_stmt_execute(), and so forth are executed. However, Com_stmt_prepare, Com_stmt_execute and Com_stmt_close also increase for PREPARE, EXECUTE, or DEALLOCATE PREPARE, respectively. Additionally, the values of the older (available since MySQL 4.1.3) statement counter variables Com_prepare_sql, Com_execute_sql, and Com_dealloc_sql increase for the PREPARE, EXECUTE, and DEALLOCATE PREPARE statements. Com_stmt_fetch stands for the total number of network round-trips issued when fetching from cursors.

    All of the Com_stmt_xxx variables are increased even if a prepared statement argument is unknown or an error occurred during execution. In other words, their values correspond to the number of requests issued, not to the number of requests successfully completed.

  • Compression

    Whether the client connection uses compression in the client/server protocol. Added in MySQL 5.1.2.

  • Connections

    The number of connection attempts (successful or not) to the MySQL server.

  • Created_tmp_disk_tables

    The number of temporary tables on disk created automatically by the server while executing statements.

  • Created_tmp_files

    How many temporary files mysqld has created.

  • Created_tmp_tables

    The number of in-memory temporary tables created automatically by the server while executing statements. If Created_tmp_disk_tables is large, you may want to increase the tmp_table_size value to cause temporary tables to be memory-based instead of disk-based.

  • Delayed_errors

    The number of rows written with INSERT DELAYED for which some error occurred (probably duplicate key).

  • Delayed_insert_threads

    The number of INSERT DELAYED handler threads in use.

  • Delayed_writes

    The number of INSERT DELAYED rows written.

  • Flush_commands

    The number of executed FLUSH statements.

  • Handler_commit

    The number of internal COMMIT statements.

  • Handler_discover

    The MySQL server can ask the NDB Cluster storage engine if it knows about a table with a given name. This is called discovery. Handler_discover indicates the number of times that tables have been discovered via this mechanism.

  • Handler_delete

    The number of times that rows have been deleted from tables.

  • Handler_read_first

    The number of times the first entry was read from an index. If this value is high, it suggests that the server is doing a lot of full index scans; for example, SELECT col1 FROM foo, assuming that col1 is indexed.

  • Handler_read_key

    The number of requests to read a row based on a key. If this value is high, it is a good indication that your tables are properly indexed for your queries.

  • Handler_read_next

    The number of requests to read the next row in key order. This value is incremented if you are querying an index column with a range constraint or if you are doing an index scan.

  • Handler_read_prev

    The number of requests to read the previous row in key order. This read method is mainly used to optimize ORDER BY ... DESC.

  • Handler_read_rnd

    The number of requests to read a row based on a fixed position. This value is high if you are doing a lot of queries that require sorting of the result. You probably have a lot of queries that require MySQL to scan entire tables or you have joins that don't use keys properly.

  • Handler_read_rnd_next

    The number of requests to read the next row in the data file. This value is high if you are doing a lot of table scans. Generally this suggests that your tables are not properly indexed or that your queries are not written to take advantage of the indexes you have.

  • Handler_rollback

    The number of internal ROLLBACK statements.

  • Handler_update

    The number of requests to update a row in a table.

  • Handler_write

    The number of requests to insert a row in a table.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_data

    The number of pages containing data (dirty or clean).

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_dirty

    The number of pages currently dirty.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_flushed

    The number of buffer pool page-flush requests.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_free

    The number of free pages.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_latched

    The number of latched pages in InnoDB buffer pool. These are pages currently being read or written or that cannot be flushed or removed for some other reason.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_misc

    The number of pages that are busy because they have been allocated for administrative overhead such as row locks or the adaptive hash index. This value can also be calculated as Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_totalInnodb_buffer_pool_pages_freeInnodb_buffer_pool_pages_data.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_total

    The total size of the buffer pool, in pages.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_read_ahead_rnd

    The number of “random” read-aheads initiated by InnoDB. This happens when a query scans a large portion of a table but in random order.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_read_ahead_seq

    The number of sequential read-aheads initiated by InnoDB. This happens when InnoDB does a sequential full table scan.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_read_requests

    The number of logical read requests InnoDB has done.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_reads

    The number of logical reads that InnoDB could not satisfy from the buffer pool and had to do a single-page read.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_wait_free

    Normally, writes to the InnoDB buffer pool happen in the background. However, if it is necessary to read or create a page and no clean pages are available, it is also necessary to wait for pages to be flushed first. This counter counts instances of these waits. If the buffer pool size has been set properly, this value should be small.

  • Innodb_buffer_pool_write_requests

    The number writes done to the InnoDB buffer pool.

  • Innodb_data_fsyncs

    The number of fsync() operations so far.

  • Innodb_data_pending_fsyncs

    The current number of pending fsync() operations.

  • Innodb_data_pending_reads

    The current number of pending reads.

  • Innodb_data_pending_writes

    The current number of pending writes.

  • Innodb_data_read

    The amount of data read so far, in bytes.

  • Innodb_data_reads

    The total number of data reads.

  • Innodb_data_writes

    The total number of data writes.

  • Innodb_data_written

    The amount of data written so far, in bytes.

  • Innodb_dblwr_writes, Innodb_dblwr_pages_written

    The number of doublewrite operations that have been performed and the number of pages that have been written for this purpose. See Section 14.2.14.1, “Disk I/O”.

  • Innodb_log_waits

    The number of times that the log buffer was too small and a wait was required for it to be flushed before continuing.

  • Innodb_log_write_requests

    The number of log write requests.

  • Innodb_log_writes

    The number of physical writes to the log file.

  • Innodb_os_log_fsyncs

    The number of fsync() writes done to the log file.

  • Innodb_os_log_pending_fsyncs

    The number of pending log file fsync() operations.

  • Innodb_os_log_pending_writes

    The number of pending log file writes.

  • Innodb_os_log_written

    The number of bytes written to the log file.

  • Innodb_page_size

    The compiled-in InnoDB page size (default 16KB). Many values are counted in pages; the page size allows them to be easily converted to bytes.

  • Innodb_pages_created

    The number of pages created.

  • Innodb_pages_read

    The number of pages read.

  • Innodb_pages_written

    The number of pages written.

  • Innodb_row_lock_current_waits

    The number of row locks currently being waited for.

  • Innodb_row_lock_time

    The total time spent in acquiring row locks, in milliseconds.

  • Innodb_row_lock_time_avg

    The average time to acquire a row lock, in milliseconds.

  • Innodb_row_lock_time_max

    The maximum time to acquire a row lock, in milliseconds.

  • Innodb_row_lock_waits

    The number of times a row lock had to be waited for.

  • Innodb_rows_deleted

    The number of rows deleted from InnoDB tables.

  • Innodb_rows_inserted

    The number of rows inserted into InnoDB tables.

  • Innodb_rows_read

    The number of rows read from InnoDB tables.

  • Innodb_rows_updated

    The number of rows updated in InnoDB tables.

  • Key_blocks_not_flushed

    The number of key blocks in the key cache that have changed but have not yet been flushed to disk.

  • Key_blocks_unused

    The number of unused blocks in the key cache. You can use this value to determine how much of the key cache is in use; see the discussion of key_buffer_size in Section 5.2.2, “Server System Variables”.

  • Key_blocks_used

    The number of used blocks in the key cache. This value is a high-water mark that indicates the maximum number of blocks that have ever been in use at one time.

  • Key_read_requests

    The number of requests to read a key block from the cache.

  • Key_reads

    The number of physical reads of a key block from disk. If Key_reads is large, then your key_buffer_size value is probably too small. The cache miss rate can be calculated as Key_reads/Key_read_requests.

  • Key_write_requests

    The number of requests to write a key block to the cache.

  • Key_writes

    The number of physical writes of a key block to disk.

  • Last_query_cost

    The total cost of the last compiled query as computed by the query optimizer. This is useful for comparing the cost of different query plans for the same query. The default value of 0 means that no query has been compiled yet. The default value is 0. Last_query_cost has session scope.

  • Max_used_connections

    The maximum number of connections that have been in use simultaneously since the server started.

  • Not_flushed_delayed_rows

    The number of rows waiting to be written in INSERT DELAY queues.

  • Open_files

    The number of files that are open.

  • Open_streams

    The number of streams that are open (used mainly for logging).

  • Open_tables

    The number of tables that are open.

  • Opened_tables

    The number of tables that have been opened. If Opened_tables is big, your table_open_cache value is probably too small.

  • Qcache_free_blocks

    The number of free memory blocks in the query cache.

  • Qcache_free_memory

    The amount of free memory for the query cache.

  • Qcache_hits

    The number of query cache hits.

  • Qcache_inserts

    The number of queries added to the query cache.

  • Qcache_lowmem_prunes

    The number of queries that were deleted from the query cache because of low memory.

  • Qcache_not_cached

    The number of non-cached queries (not cacheable, or not cached due to the query_cache_type setting).

  • Qcache_queries_in_cache

    The number of queries registered in the query cache.

  • Qcache_total_blocks

    The total number of blocks in the query cache.

  • Questions

    The number of statements that clients have sent to the server.

  • Rpl_status

    The status of failsafe replication (not yet implemented).

  • Select_full_join

    The number of joins that perform table scans because they do not use indexes. If this value is not 0, you should carefully check the indexes of your tables.

  • Select_full_range_join

    The number of joins that used a range search on a reference table.

  • Select_range

    The number of joins that used ranges on the first table. This is normally not a critical issue even if the value is quite large.

  • Select_range_check

    The number of joins without keys that check for key usage after each row. If this is not 0, you should carefully check the indexes of your tables.

  • Select_scan

    The number of joins that did a full scan of the first table.

  • Slave_open_temp_tables

    The number of temporary tables that the slave SQL thread currently has open.

  • Slave_running

    This is ON if this server is a slave that is connected to a master.

  • Slave_retried_transactions

    The total number of times since startup that the replication slave SQL thread has retried transactions.

  • Slow_launch_threads

    The number of threads that have taken more than slow_launch_time seconds to create.

  • Slow_queries

    The number of queries that have taken more than long_query_time seconds. See Section 5.11.5, “The Slow Query Log”.

  • Sort_merge_passes

    The number of merge passes that the sort algorithm has had to do. If this value is large, you should consider increasing the value of the sort_buffer_size system variable.

  • Sort_range

    The number of sorts that were done using ranges.

  • Sort_rows

    The number of sorted rows.

  • Sort_scan

    The number of sorts that were done by scanning the table.

  • Ssl_xxx

    Variables used for SSL connections.

  • Table_locks_immediate

    The number of times that a table lock was acquired immediately.

  • Table_locks_waited

    The number of times that a table lock could not be acquired immediately and a wait was needed. If this is high and you have performance problems, you should first optimize your queries, and then either split your table or tables or use replication.

  • Threads_cached

    The number of threads in the thread cache.

  • Threads_connected

    The number of currently open connections.

  • Threads_created

    The number of threads created to handle connections. If Threads_created is big, you may want to increase the thread_cache_size value. The cache hit rate can be calculated as Threads_created/Connections.

  • Threads_running

    The number of threads that are not sleeping.

  • Uptime

    The number of seconds that the server has been up.


 
 
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