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4.3.4. Using Options to Set Program Variables

Many MySQL programs have internal variables that can be set at runtime. Program variables are set the same way as any other long option that takes a value. For example, mysql has a max_allowed_packet variable that controls the maximum size of its communication buffer. To set the max_allowed_packet variable for mysql to a value of 16MB, use either of the following commands:

shell> mysql --max_allowed_packet=16777216
shell> mysql --max_allowed_packet=16M

The first command specifies the value in bytes. The second specifies the value in megabytes. For variables that take a numeric value, the value can be given with a suffix of K, M, or G (either uppercase or lowercase) to indicate a multiplier of 1024, 10242 or 10243. (For example, when used to set max_allowed_packet, the suffixes indicate units of kilobytes, megabytes, or gigabygtes.)

In an option file, variable settings are given without the leading dashes:

[mysql]
max_allowed_packet=16777216

Or:

[mysql]
max_allowed_packet=16M

If you like, underscores in a variable name can be specified as dashes. The following option groups are equivalent. Both set the size of the server's key buffer to 512MB:

[mysqld]
key_buffer_size=512M

[mysqld]
key-buffer-size=512M

Note: Before MySQL 4.0.2, the only syntax for setting program variables was --set-variable=option=value (or set-variable=option=value in option files). This syntax still is recognized, but is deprecated as of MySQL 4.0.2.

Many server system variables can also be set at runtime. For details, see Section 5.2.3.2, “Dynamic System Variables”.


 
 
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