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16.6.4. Single-User Mode

Single-user mode allows the database administrator to restrict access to the database system to a single MySQL server (SQL node). When entering single-user mode, all connections to all other MySQL servers are closed gracefully and all running transactions are aborted. No new transactions are allowed to be started.

Once the cluster has entered single-user mode, only the designated SQL node is granted access to the database.

You can use the ALL STATUS command to see when the cluster has entered single-user mode.

Example:

NDB> ENTER SINGLE USER MODE 5

After this command has executed and the cluster has entered single-user mode, the SQL node whose node ID is 5 becomes the cluster's only permitted user.

The node specified in the preceding command must be a MySQL Server node; An attempt to specify any other type of node will be rejected.

Note: When the preceding commmand is invoked, all transactions running on the designated node are aborted, the connection is closed, and the server must be restarted.

The command EXIT SINGLE USER MODE changes the state of the cluster's data nodes from single-user mode to normal mode. MySQL Servers waiting for a connection (that is, for the cluster to become ready and available), are again permitted to connect. The MySQL Server denoted as the single-user SQL node continues to run (if still connected) during and after the state change.

Example:

NDB> EXIT SINGLE USER MODE

There are two recommended ways to handle a node failure when running in single-user mode:

  • Method 1:

    1. Finish all single-user mode transactions

    2. Issue the EXIT SINGLE USER MODE command

    3. Restart the cluster's data nodes

  • Method 2:

    Restart database nodes prior to entering single-user mode.


 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire