Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions

  




 

 

16.1. MySQL Cluster Overview

MySQL Cluster is a technology that enables clustering of in-memory databases in a share-nothing system. The share-nothing architecture allows the system to work with very inexpensive hardware, and without any specific requirements on hardware or software. It also does not have any single point of failure because each component has its own memory and disk.

MySQL Cluster integrates the standard MySQL server with an in-memory clustered storage engine called NDB. In our documentation, the term NDB refers to the part of the setup that is specific to the storage engine, whereas “MySQL Cluster” refers to the combination of MySQL and the NDB storage engine.

A MySQL Cluster consists of a set of computers, each running a number of processes including MySQL servers, data nodes for NDB Cluster, management servers, and (possibly) specialized data access programs. The relationship of these components in a cluster is shown here:

MySQL Cluster Components

All these programs work together to form a MySQL Cluster. When data is stored in the NDB Cluster storage engine, the tables are stored in the data nodes. Such tables are directly accessible from all other MySQL servers in the cluster. Thus, in a payroll application storing data in a cluster, if one application updates the salary of an employee, all other MySQL servers that query this data can see this change immediately.

The data stored in the data nodes for MySQL Cluster can be mirrored; the cluster can handle failures of individual data nodes with no other impact than that a small number of transactions are aborted due to losing the transaction state. Because transactional applications are expected to handle transaction failure, this should not be a source of problems.

By bringing MySQL Cluster to the Open Source world, MySQL AB makes clustered data management with high availability, high performance, and scalability available to all who need it.


 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire