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I.2. Restrictions on Server-Side Cursors

Server-side cursors are implemented in the C API via the mysql_stmt_attr_set() function. The same implementation is used for cursors in stored routines. A server-side cursor allows a result set to be generated on the server side, but not transferred to the client except for those rows that the client requests. For example, if a client executes a query but is only interested in the first row, the remaining rows are not transferred.

In MySQL, a server-side cursor is materialized into a temporary table. Initially, this is a MEMORY table, but is converted to a MyISAM table if its size reaches the value of the max_heap_table_size system variable. One limitation of the implementation is that for a large result set, retrieving its rows through a cursor might be slow.

Cursors are read-only; you cannot use a cursor to update rows.

UPDATE WHERE CURRENT OF and DELETE WHERE CURRENT OF are not implemented, because updatable cursors are not supported.

Cursors are non-holdable (not held open after a commit).

Cursors are asensitive.

Cursors are non-scrollable.

Cursors are not named. The statement handler acts as the cursor ID.

You can have open only a single cursor per prepared statement. If you need several cursors, you must prepare several statements.

You cannot use a cursor for a statement that generates a result set if the statement is not supported in prepared mode. This includes statements such as CHECK TABLES, HANDLER READ, and SHOW BINLOG EVENTS.


 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire