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10.3.4. Column Character Set and Collation

Every “character” column (that is, a column of type CHAR, VARCHAR, or TEXT) has a column character set and a column collation. Column definition syntax has optional clauses for specifying the column character set and collation:

col_name {CHAR | VARCHAR | TEXT} (col_length)
    [CHARACTER SET charset_name [COLLATE collation_name]]

Example:

CREATE TABLE Table1
(
    column1 VARCHAR(5) CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_german1_ci
);

MySQL chooses the column character set and collation in the following manner:

  • If both CHARACTER SET X and COLLATE Y were specified, then character set X and collation Y are used.

  • If CHARACTER SET X was specified without COLLATE, then character set X and its default collation are used.

  • If COLLATE Y was specified without CHARACTER SET, then the character set associated with Y and collation Y.

  • Otherwise, the table character set and collation are used.

The CHARACTER SET and COLLATE clauses are standard SQL.


 
 
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