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NOTE: CentOS Enterprise Linux is built from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux source code. Other than logo and name changes CentOS Enterprise Linux is compatible with the equivalent Red Hat version. This document applies equally to both Red Hat and CentOS Enterprise Linux.

Chapter 3. Managing Files and Directories

This chapter explores the general format of your Red Hat Enterprise Linux file system. It bridges the differences between using Nautilus to manage the files on your system and using a shell prompt to manage them. It does not go into the minute details of using a shell prompt; those will be covered in Chapter 4 Shell Prompt Basics. This chapter orients you to the system as a whole, and then you can choose which method of management you prefer.

Note Note
 

Due to system security, unless you are root, you are not allowed to gain access to all system-level files and directories. If you do not have the permission to open, delete, or execute a file, an error message is displayed showing your access has been denied. This is normal behavior and is used to prevent non-privileged users from modifying or deleting important system files.

3.1. File System Terms

Below are a few terms to know before we begin our discussion of the file system.

extension

An extension is that part of a filename that is found after the final ".". In the filename foo.txt ".txt" is the file's extension. Extensions are used to indicate file type.

path

A path is the string of directories and sub-directories you would have to navigate through in order to reach a given location in the file system.

root access (or root privileges)

To have root access means to be logged in using the root account. This can be done from the main login screen, a shell prompt, or any application that requires your root password. Root access means that the user has permission to do anything on the system, so use root access with care.

root directory

The root directory is the top-most directory of the file system. All other files and directories exist in this directory or one of its sub-directories. Do not confuse the root directory, /, with root's home directory, /root/.

 
 
  Published under the terms of the GNU General Public License Design by Interspire