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Android Development
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Network Address Space

Each instance of the emulator runs behind a virtual router/firewall service that isolates it from your development machine's network interfaces and settings and from the internet. An emulated device can not see your development machine or other emulator instances on the network. Instead, it sees only that it is connected through Ethernet to a router/firewall.

The virtual router for each instance manages the 10.0.2/24 network address space — all addresses managed by the router are in the form of 10.0.2.<xx>, where <xx> is a number. Addresses within this space are pre-allocated by the emulator/router as follows:

Network Address Description
10.0.2.1 Router/gateway address
10.0.2.2 Special alias to your host loopback interface (i.e., 127.0.0.1 on your development machine)
10.0.2.3 First DNS server
10.0.2.4 / 10.0.2.5 / 10.0.2.6 Optional second, third and fourth DNS server (if any)
10.0.2.15 The emulated device's own network/ethernet interface
127.0.0.1 The emulated device's own loopback interface

Note that the same address assignments are used by all running emulator instances. That means that if you have two instances running concurrently on your machine, each will have its own router and, behind that, each will have an IP address of 10.0.2.15. The instances are isolated by a router and can not see each other on the same network. For information about how to let emulator instances communicate over TCP/UDP, see Connecting Emulator Instances.

Also note that the address 127.0.0.1 on your development machine corresponds to the emulator's own loopback interface. If you want to access services running on your development machine's loopback interface (a.k.a. 127.0.0.1 on your machine), you should use the special address 10.0.2.2 instead.

Finally, note that each emulated device's pre-allocated addresses are specific to the Android emulator and will probably be very different on real devices (which are also very likely to be NAT-ed, i.e., behind a router/firewall)

Android Development
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